Mobile content soars thanks to device and network advances

Posted on August 31st, 2010 by | Filed under: Marketing News, Uncategorized

Mobile phones have become a staple of daily life, so much so that most consumers can hardly imagine going through the day without one by their side. The reliance on mobile devices for just about everything makes mobile a platform that content publishers and marketers cannot afford to ignore.

eMarketer predicts mobile content revenues will rise from less than $1.15 billion in 2009 to more than $3.53 billion in 2014, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of nearly 20% over the period.

“The continuing advance of smart devices—including tablet-style computers, led by Apple’s iPad—and the growing ubiquity of mobile broadband networks mean that consumers have to make fewer compromises when it comes to the consumption of games, music and video,” said Noah Elkin, eMarketer senior analyst and author of the new report, “Mobile Content: Games, Music and Video Take to the Cloud.” “An improved user experience, and the ability to access an ever-expanding variety of content from the cloud, will attract many new mobile content consumers in the next five years.”

US Moblie Content Revenues by Segment 2009-2014

The fastest growth will come from mobile music, which starts from the smallest base and will move from a market focused on ringtones to one where mobile-broadband-enabled users pay to access full-length songs from the cloud.

US mobile Music Listeners, 2008-2014

Games are the most popular mobile activity in number of users, and there is a growing emphasis on monetizing such content through downloads and advertising, rather than shipping phones with games preinstalled.

The mobile video audience will increase threefold between 2009 and 2014, with the steady improvement of devices, the increase in mobile broadband availability and the emergence of viewing options outside the carrier networks. These factors will help boost revenue growth to a CAGR of more than 25% from 2009 to 2014.


Showcase – Advertising – Surplus Series Ad

Posted on August 25th, 2010 by | Filed under: Advertising, Showcase

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Showcase – Advertising – Surplus Series Ad 2

Posted on August 25th, 2010 by | Filed under: Advertising, Showcase

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Showcase – Advertising – Surplus Series Ad

Posted on August 25th, 2010 by | Filed under: Advertising, Showcase

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DMA report: Digital media marketing strong, social media pervasive

Posted on July 29th, 2010 by | Filed under: Marketing News, Uncategorized

LinkedIn and Twitter Logo

New York—Most marketers are using digital media both to sell and nurture a stronger bond with their customers, according to the newly released “Digital Marketing Practices and Trends,” a study conducted by the Direct Marketing Association. The report also found that the use of social media has become a mainstream marketing channel.

The report, based on an online survey in November and December 2009 that produced 541 usable responses, found that 62% of marketers use paid keywords, followed by banner/skyscraper ads (45%), affiliate networks (28%), hot links (26%) and sponsorships (23%).

Among b-to-b companies, social media marketing has become pervasive: 88% report using social media, with the most widely used channels being professional social networks such as LinkedIn (69%), followed by microblogs such as Twitter (53%) and blogs (47%).


Should my email design match my Web site?

Posted on July 29th, 2010 by | Filed under: Marketing News

It’s very important to use design elements—such as color, art, logos, etc.—to make visual connections between your Web site and your e-mail. When you sign up e-mail list members on your Web site, you want the e-mail to be an extension of the site that your customers recognize. If there is a disconnect because the e-mail doesn’t look like the Web site, your subscribers may think your e-mail is spam.

Conversely, when you send out e-mails with a call to action that takes recipients back to a landing page, you don’t want to confuse those readers by sending them to a Web site that doesn’t look like the company you portray in your e-mail.

This happened to me recently. I got an e-mail from a major airline that featured a color scheme that was predominately the company’s trademark yellow and orange. Clicking through to the airline’s Web site, I was shocked to land on a page that was mainly blue and purple. My initial thought was that I was on the wrong page. What I learned is that the company rebranded its Web site but has not carried the new branding elements through to its e-mail program.

While it’s not unusual for companies to rebrand or to freshen their brand, it’s important to keep some of the old elements—at least on a temporary basis—to bridge to the new brand. You also need to make sure that your e-mail program catches up at the same time. This can be a struggle if e-mail marketing and your Web site are managed by different groups, but the outcome is worth the effort.

When designing your e-mails, look to your Web site for design elements and incorporate some of those elements into your e-mail. If you have an html Web site, you can even use elements from the Web site to easily design your e-mail.

Remember: it’s all about integrating the same look and feel from Web site to e-mail, and even to printed marketing materials. Carrying a similar look throughout all these customer touch points makes customers comfortable with your brand, which in turn makes them comfortable pulling out their wallets.

Thanks to Carissa Newton


Nielsen: Time To Recommit to Boomers

Posted on July 29th, 2010 by | Filed under: Marketing in a Recession, Marketing News

As focused as marketers are these days on Gen Y’s environmental commitment or Gen X’s coupon savvy, Nielsen reports that CPG companies have major blind spots in the way they target Baby Boomers.

With a continued emphasis on either the 18-to-34 or the 18-to-49 demographic, companies are increasingly losing their connection with the 78 million Baby Boomers, Doug Anderson, SVP/research & development for Nielsen, tells Marketing Daily.

“There is practically no segment or category out there where Boomers aren’t a significant audience — even across technology, including cell phones and computers. They may not be the first ones in the door when a new product comes out, but it’s close,” he says. “They are purchasing at rates just as high as other segments, and because they are often buying for their kids, many are double-dipping.”

While Boomers spend 38.5% of CPG dollars, Nielsen estimates that only 5% of advertising dollars are currently targeted toward adults 35-64 years old (a slice that includes the latter half of Generation X as well as Boomers).

Part of the issue, he says, is that marketers continue to believe that Boomers are either reluctant to experiment with new technology and brands, or that because they’ve been loyal to a certain brand for a number of years, they’ll stay that way.

Another issue, he says, is that even marketers who do focus on Boomers tend to make errors. Nuance, he says, really matters. “It is certainly true that Baby Boomers are big, important marketplaces for almost all products, and they need to be talked to and marketed to and advertised to directly,” he says. “But it has to be in ways they will accept. They are not 27, and they are not 67.”

Nielsen’s research says Boomers dominate 1,023 out of 1,083 consumer packaged goods categories, and watch 9.34 hours of video per day—more than any other segment. They also comprise a third of all TV viewers, online users, social media users and Twitter users, and are significantly more likely to have broadband Internet.

“Marketers have this tendency to think the Baby Boom—getting closer to retirement—will just be calm and peaceful as they move ahead, and that’s not true. Everything we see with our behavioral data says these people are going to be active consumers for much longer. They are going to be in better health, and despite the ugliness around the retirement stuff now, they are still going to be more affluent,” Anderson says. “They are going to be an important segment for a long time.”

Thanks to Sara Mahoney at Marketing Daily


Showcase – Advertising – Sizzix Teaser Ad

Posted on July 28th, 2010 by | Filed under: Advertising, Showcase


Showcase – Advertising – Sizzix Teaser Ad

Posted on July 28th, 2010 by | Filed under: Advertising, Showcase


Showcase – Advertising – Sizzix Reveal Ad

Posted on July 28th, 2010 by | Filed under: Advertising, Showcase

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